Wednesday 6th May 2020

Birding in Lockdown: Links to Garden Lockdown Listing League and our Birding Ideas Page, helping to make the most of extra time as a result of the lockdown.

Late news, 5/5, Penzance: 2 Manx Shearwater close to shore between Jubilee Pool and Lighthouse Pier. (J Evans)

Late news, 5/5, Falmouth Bay: 3 Great Skua together harassing gulls. (S McCartney)

Cadgwith: 1s Little Gull, 1 Balearic Shearwater, 2 Arctic Skua, 5 Great Northern Diver. (S Croft)

Stithians Reservoir: fem Whinchat, 1 Grasshopper Warbler reeling, 30+ Swift most displaying west end. (S Turner)

Upton Towans LNR: male Whinchat. (P Freestone)

Marazion Marsh RSPB: drk Garganey 05:55-07:25 on Longrock Pool then flew to main marsh. Also fem Marsh Harrier, 12 Swift, c25 Sand Martin, 1 Willow Warbler, 2 Stock Dove. (R Veal, S Rogers) Later 2 drk Garganey. (S Turner, J Hicks, S Rogers)

Marazion Beach: 5 Grey Plover, 5 Bar-tailed Godwit, c75 Dunlin, c25 Sanderling, 8 Ringed Plover, c10 Turnstone, 1 Common Sandpiper, c50 Whimbrel; 2+ Arctic Skua, c30 Common Scoter, 4 Sandwich Tern offshore. (S Rogers, P St Pierre, R Veal) male Yellow Wagtail this evening. (S Rogers)

Yellow Wagtail, Steve Rogers

Polgigga: fem Marsh Harrier over (presumed same as Skewjack bird), 5 Spotted Flycatcher at Porthgwarra. (M Wallace)

St Just: 21 Wheatear, 13 Whimbrel, 3 Sandwich Tern, 14 House & 3 Sand Martin. (D Flumm)

Newlyn: 4 Arctic Skua, 1 Great Skua from Sandy Cove. (L Proctor)

Falmouth: 1 pair Eider still off Gyllyngvase Beach, 5 Swift over Trescobeas area. (J St Ledger) Falmouth Bay: 1 adult Pomarine Skua, 1 Great Northern Diver, 2 Shag, 1 Common Gull (T Phelps, M Doyle)

Rosemullion Head, Falmouth: 1 Spotted Flycatcher, 2 Stonechat, 1 Shag, 1 Raven, 2 Gannet. (P Oldcorn)

Pendennis Point: 1 Spotted Flycatcher, 1 Wheatear, 1 Sedge Warbler, 4 Whitethroat, 6 Blackcap, 12 House Martin, 1 Sand Martin, 3 Swallows, 8 Swifts, 1 Siskin, 1 Whimbrel (T Phelps, M Doyle)

Caradon Hill: 4 Buzzard, 1m Kestrel (with snake sp.), 1 Stonechat, 1 Tree Pipit, 1 Yellowhammer, 1 Raven, 1 Crow, 4 Herring Gull, 20+ Starling. (D Sharp)

Kestrel, Deena Sharp

Kestrel, Deena Sharp

Lostwithiel: 4 Swift, pr Siskin on feeders. (M Simon) 6 Swift over the town, flew away towards North. (C Jewels)

Dobwalls: 1 Blackcap and 1 Green Woodpecker heard; saw 1 Red Kite, pair of Siskins and 1m Bullfinch (C&J Dufy)

Tintagel: 1 Red Kite harassed by gulls 1820. (I Hall)

Downderry: birds moving west before 0720 included 5 Manx Shearwaters, a Sandwich Tern, 73 Auk sp. and an Arctic Skua. Meanwhile, c45 Common Scoters, a Shelduck and 15 Kittiwakes flew east. 31 Whimbrel this afternoon. (A Payne)

St Erth: c200 Hirundine sp. feeding over fields, roughly evenly split between Sand Martin, House Martin and Swallow; c20 Swift. (R Veal)

Truro: first fledged Robin young of the year in garden. (R Netherton) pr Siskin in another garden, 1 Swift over. (D Jenkins)

juv. Robin, Robin Netherton

Cornwall Lockdown Diary, Day 44:

One of my lockdown pastimes has been to follow the live webcam of the Ospreys in the Glaslyn valley in north Wales. There, a brilliantly positioned camera spies on the comings and goings of Mrs G and Aran, a pair that have used the nest site for years. They now have three eggs, and Glaslyn Wildlife (the tiny charity that looks after them) will tell us the moment they hatch. Twenty year old Mrs G broods her precious clutch while Aran returns with fish from the well-stocked estuary.

I have been to the Glaslyn site and there are at least three Osprey nests in the area. It is a wonderful place with Snowdon and its outlier hills the glorious backdrop. To see these magnificent birds of prey in their natural environment, the successful launching pad for many a young Osprey, was a great experience, so I was always envious when I saw on this website reports of sightings in north Cornwall.

Until yesterday that is, when my statutory exercise took me to a deserted and blowy Trevose Head. I was watching four large juvenile Ravens in the nest when I caught sight of their parents chasing what I first thought was another Raven, but which the binoculars thrillingly revealed as an Osprey with its much longer wings, pale head and dark eye mask. It shrugged off these attentions and sauntered around Booby’s Bay, finally disappearing north eastwards.

Simon Marquis (palores@cbwps.org.uk)